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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Competitive interactions between Douglas-fir and red alder seedlings found in the catalog.

Competitive interactions between Douglas-fir and red alder seedlings

Lauri J. Shainsky

Competitive interactions between Douglas-fir and red alder seedlings

growth analysis, resource use, and physiology

by Lauri J. Shainsky

  • 255 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir -- Growth.,
  • Red alder -- Growth.,
  • Plant competition -- Longitudinal studies.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Lauri J. Shainsky.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination221 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages221
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15528470M

    plantations of alder and Douglas-fir. They are located on ground designated as Douglas-fir site class III or below. These low site qualities are often a result of nitrogen deficient soils. Each site is planted at trees per acre with five proportions of the two species. The site layout is designed to look at the interactions between the two.   Competition for water in a mixture of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco) and red alder (Alnus rubra (Bong.)Carriere) was demonstrated in a study by Shainsky and Radosevich ().These authors showed that soil moisture limitations were created by increasing density of both species ().Increasing the density of alder reduced soil water content (at 90 cm depth) at most Douglas.

    Title: Early Competitive Interactions Between Red Alder and Salmonberry in the Oreqon Coast Ranqe Signature redacted for privacy. Abstract approved: Dr/ M1dh1 Newton General outcomes of this study show that early growth of planted red alder is often slowed in the presence of neighboring vegetation, and overwhelmingly by salmonberry, a.   Pure stands of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.]Franco) and mixed stands of Douglas-fir and naturally established red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) were examined on two different sites for soil properties, tree growth and nutrition, and aboveground ecosystem biomass and net primary site (Mt. Benson, Nanaimo, B.C.) was nitrogen (N)-deficient and had a low site index.

    Red alder density of up to tph may be acceptable on nitrogen deficient sites. Douglas-fir growth may be enhanced when red alder density is relatively low at age Competitive effects of red alder were lower than that of conifers in this study. The effectiveness of competition indices . In young, equal-aged mixtures, however, the ben­ eficial effects of Nrfixation to Douglas-fir can be counter­ acted by the competitive effects of nearby rapidly growing alder. Delaying alder planting or maintaining adequate tree spacing by early thinning are means to reduce alder competition.


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Competitive interactions between Douglas-fir and red alder seedlings by Lauri J. Shainsky Download PDF EPUB FB2

The effect of clipping frequency on the competitive interaction between two perennial grass species. and D. Levin. Interactions between seed source, planting arrangement, and soil treatment in L. J., and S. Radosevich. Mechanisms of competition between Douglas-fir and red alder seedlings.

Ecology Brozek S () Effect of soil changes caused by red alder (Alnus rubra) on biomass and nutrient status of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings. Can J For Res – Google Scholar Burkhart HE, Tham A () Predictions from growth and Cited by: Part of the similarity between the alder ectomycorrhizal communities in the Pacific Northwest and Mexico may reflect a common biogeographic history of their host species.

jorullensis and A. acuminata are both descendants of the same alder lineage as A. rubra, and alders in western North America are known to all share a common ancestor that.

Competitive interactions in young, coastal Douglas-fir/red alder mixtures: Implications for wood quality. James Robbins, M.S. in Forest Products and Forest Science. Influence of spacing and crown recession on wood quality of intensively-managed young-growth Douglas-fir. years at the DC site for (a) Douglas-fir and (b) red alder 62 Relationships between Douglas-fir relative growth rates (RGR) over years at the CH site and (a) intra- and (b) inter-specific interference (l[aa and "ab, respectively) 64 Conceptual model of.

Variation in the relative competitive abilities of plant species between different environments (such as climate) has been proposed as a control of the species composition of plant communities.

This thesis examines whether the competitive abilities of paper birch and Douglas-fir vary with climate from a coastal site to a southern interior site in British Columbia. The overall hypothesis is.

the time of this study, Douglas-fir trees were 15 years old, and alders were either 10 or 15 years old. Because the age of the red alder trees varied among treatments, the proportion of trees in the stand that were red alder did not accurately reflect a comparable measure of the competitive pressure exerted on Douglas-fir trees by red alder.

Description. Red alder is the largest species of alder in North America and one of the largest in the world, reaching heights of 20 to 30 m (66 to 98 ft). The official tallest red alder () stands 32 m ( ft) tall in Clatsop County, Oregon (US). The name derives from the bright rusty red color that develops in bruised or scraped bark.

Seedlings of red alder However; it is not known how these differences in seedling responses will affect competitive interactions over the lifetimes of large trees in ecosystems.

and W. Ferrell. Photosynthesis and growth of Douglas-fir seedlings when grown in different environments. Canadian Journal of Botany   We conducted a two-year study to assess the aboveground interactions between Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), grand fir (Abies grandis) and noble fir (Abies procera) seedlings planted in closely spaced (stems 10 cm apart) conspecific and heterospecific pairs.

Paired seedling growth also was compared to seedlings planted with no neighbor. These early seral red alder communities suppress competing conifers, but after about 25 years, conifers equal red alder height and begin to overtop them.

After about 40 years, Douglas-fir becomes dominant. Few red alder trees remain in stands past 60 years [16,67]. SEASONAL DEVELOPMENT: Red alder is a deciduous tree. Flowers begin to form in. 1 We used repeated measurements of tree growth and population‐level and neighbourhood conditions from three mixed Alnus rubra/Pseudotsuga menziesii forests in the Pacific Northwest, USA to investigate why previous results regarding the importance of neighbourhood competition as a determinant of plant growth were inconsistent.

2 We propose that relative dominance. Where the red alder cover is particularly dense, seedling establishment of Douglas-fir may be inhibited. Where seedling establishment is sparse and initial tree density or stocking generally low (e.g., many ponderosa pine forests), competitive thinning (stage 2) might not occur.

Growth in Douglas-fir is characterized by a similar cyclic growth pattern as in oak (Kaya et al., ). Kaya et al. () describe extra shoot production of Douglas-fir seedlings caused by re-watering after two drought periods, which took place 4 weeks long during the first growing season and 8 weeks long during the second growing season.

A red alder seed is a tiny samara like those of all alders Because of its abundance, red alder delivers large amounts of nitrogen to enrich forest soils. Red alder stands have been found to supply between and pounds of nitrogen per acre ( to kg per ha) annually to the soil.

and shrub competition and if the interactions between the planted trees and other vegetation is the face of invasion by non-crop trees and the competitive effects of shrubs.

These data sets for Douglas-fir, western hemlock and red alder for. 72 Figure Comparisons between field data (points) and model predictions (continuous. site was chosen in which seed producing Douglas-fir trees were more than one-fourth mile away.

(5) Clear-cut areas were selected which had been logged years earlier. Forested areas selected consisted of mixed red alder (Alnus rubra)/Douglas-fir, pure alder, and pure Douglas-fir stands (fig.4). by interspecific competition, while red alder development exhibited trends for intraspecific competition.

In the delayed planted treatments both species experienced intraspecific competition, although this effect was minor for red alder.

These results support the competitive effects of red alder on Douglas-fir and itself when seedlings. Douglas-fir trees had a relatively short season of cambial growth and many were highly suppressed.

When red alder planting was delayed five years, Douglas-fir trees had a short cambial growth season when the proportion of red alder in the stand was high\ud (75%).

Douglas-fir crown base height was low when the proportion of red alder was high. Comparative photosynthesis of red alder, Douglas-fir, Sitka spruce, and western hemlock seedlings Article in Canadian Journal of Botany 47(4) January with 21 Reads.

Nodulated red alder did not increase soil or Douglas-fir foliar nitrogen on any site or at any density, but competition from red alder trees reduced available light and moisture for Douglas-fir.The lack of interaction between density and species proportion suggests a complementarity Amoroso MM, Turnblom EC.

Comparing productivity of pure and mixed Douglas-fir and western hemlock plantations in the Pacific Northwest. Shainsky LJ, Radosevich SR. Mechanisms of competition between Douglas-fir and red alder seedlings.

Ecology. We examined growth and biomass allocation of individual Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.)Franco) and red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) seedlings grown for 3 years under contrasting combinations of light and growth was always greater than Douglas-fir.

Full sunlight and soil moisture at field capacity caused large differences in size between the two species.